Highlights of Scandinavian travel Stockholm Skansen, the world's first open-air museum

Highlights of Scandinavian travel Stockholm Skansen, the world's first open-air museum

Terbes ColbyCompilerThe contributions from Forbes collaborators are theirs.TravelGood Apps tell stories about travel and discovery around the world.Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

The world's first open-air museum is a short tram ride from central Stockholm and is well worth the time you can afford. Opened in 1891, Skansen exhibits more than 150 buildings from different periods and in different parts of Sweden, which were dismantled and delivered. There are farms from southern Sweden, a Sámi camp from the north, and even some early 20th-century buildings from Stockholm.

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We spent half a day with sunny but crisp autumn eyes and we didn't see enough of it. But we could see many interesting exhibits, walk along some beautiful walking paths, admire the picturesque views and rose gardens, and taste Swedish pancakes with blueberries in a local café. It was clearly the highlight of a trip to Scandinavia.

Skansen is a great attraction for locals and tourists alike. We two adults enjoyed the historical aspects, but we also spent a lot of time wondering what a fabulous destination it was for children, with plenty of space to run and play on the trails, as well as on the playgrounds and children's zoo.

Opening hours and ticket information. Admission prices vary depending on the season. At the end of September, we paid just under $ 15 per adult in the United States.

There are also many events throughout the year that are listed on the website's calendar of events. Here's what the museum has to say about one of the upcoming activities, Autumn Break The Horrors of the Past! 26, 2019, it sounds completely damn:

Autumn gloom descends above Skansen and restless whispers spread through the Old Town quarter. What terrible disease has plagued the city and how can the townspeople protect themselves? Should they go to the pharmacists with their pills and ointments, or is it better to listen wisely and make protective amulets?

Strange creatures move around houses and farms. Who sighs and moans in the churchyard? Do you dare to visit the wise people in Bollnäs House and the stern sexton of Seglora Church?

All kinds of exciting activities take place at Skansen during the autumn break. Listen to the horror stories of the cottages, take part in handicrafts and meet the inhabitants of a city struggling with diseases. Discover Skansen, where history lives!

Restaurants and cafes serve devastatingly delicious food. You can also grill sausages at Bollnäs Square. Bring or buy them for 15 SEK each.

I was born in Chicago and, by my choice, am happy to be on my way to finding new destinations, especially in February, which is often the grim of the city's winter months. I hold

I was born in Chicago and, by my choice, am happy to be on my way to finding new destinations, especially in February, which is often the grim of the city's winter months. I have a bachelor's and master's degree in journalism and have spent most of my career in the news working for The Associated Press and the Chicago Tribune. For the past ten years, as a freelance travel writer and photographer, I have focused on exploring the world. Highlights include observing and photographing Kenya's wildlife, documenting the monarch's wintering grounds for butterflies on a mountain in Mexico, and spending the night in a tent in the Sahara. My stories have appeared in the Chicago Tribune, the Los Angeles Times, the Chicago Sun Times, USAtoday.com and Porthole magazine, among others. I am also a dedicated reader (and sometimes reviewer) of literary fiction and love to dive into a set of novels I visit. You can find my blog at www.imsleepingaround.com.