The decalogue of Abraham Lincoln

The decalogue of Abraham Lincoln

The ten commandments of the so-called Decalogue of Abraham Lincoln are admirable in every respect. Their classic beauty also shines at the most superficial reading. Although the author and the text remain uncertain, the ten points summarize in the form of maximum auras a profound and complex political thought, little less than a general doctrine, much more than a popular wisdom. It is surprising to note that the "10 DON'T" (as they are called) are very current: a guide for action, valuable for individuals and governments. Everyone, glancing at society, sees without difficulty which and how many evils afflict it, which are a direct consequence of the violation of these prohibitions. What they command not to do is done!

In the United States the precepts enjoyed wide diffusion in every class. A success that can be explained not only with the immediate clarity of the concepts, but also with the profound response they find in the American soul. In Italy, on the contrary, they are almost unknown and very disapplicated. Disseminating them by any means, as I have done for over thirty years, is equivalent to rendering a good service to our country, although it seems almost useless. Individual life and national politics would definitely improve when these commandments, which penetrated into the conscience of the people, became the general rule of conduct in general. The "10 Points" were incorrectly ascribed to Abraham Lincoln, but the identity of the person who intentionally or unknowingly attributed them to Lincoln has never been ascertained. Here is the text, as is the most frequent use:

Unfortunately, I must note that most, if not all, of these commandments are violated, directly or obliquely, in thoughts and deeds, by the government as a whole and by ministers specifically.